Book: Concord «Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures»

Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures

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Издательство: "Книга по Требованию" (2011)

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Concord

Fox Fox (f[o^]ks), n.; pl. {Foxes}. [AS. fox; akin to D. vos, G. fuchs, OHG. fuhs, foha, Goth. fa['u]h[=o], Icel. f[=o]a fox, fox fraud; of unknown origin, cf. Skr. puccha tail. Cf. {Vixen}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A carnivorous animal of the genus {Vulpes}, family {Canid[ae]}, of many species. The European fox ({V. vulgaris} or {V. vulpes}), the American red fox ({V. fulvus}), the American gray fox ({V. Virginianus}), and the arctic, white, or blue, fox ({V. lagopus}) are well-known species. [1913 Webster]

Note: The black or silver-gray fox is a variety of the American red fox, producing a fur of great value; the cross-gray and woods-gray foxes are other varieties of the same species, of less value. The common foxes of Europe and America are very similar; both are celebrated for their craftiness. They feed on wild birds, poultry, and various small animals. [1913 Webster]

Subtle as the fox for prey. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. (Zo["o]l.) The European dragonet. [1913 Webster]

3. (Zo["o]l.) The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also {sea fox}. See {Thrasher shark}, under {Shark}. [1913 Webster]

4. A sly, cunning fellow. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

We call a crafty and cruel man a fox. --Beattie. [1913 Webster]

5. (Naut.) Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; -- used for seizings or mats. [1913 Webster]

6. A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Thou diest on point of fox. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

7. pl. (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; -- called also {Outagamies}. [1913 Webster]

{Fox and geese}. (a) A boy's game, in which one boy tries to catch others as they run one goal to another. (b) A game with sixteen checkers, or some substitute for them, one of which is called the fox, and the rest the geese; the fox, whose first position is in the middle of the board, endeavors to break through the line of the geese, and the geese to pen up the fox.

{Fox bat} (Zo["o]l.), a large fruit bat of the genus {Pteropus}, of many species, inhabiting Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, esp. {P. medius} of India. Some of the species are more than four feet across the outspread wings. See {Fruit bat}.

{Fox bolt}, a bolt having a split end to receive a fox wedge.

{Fox brush} (Zo["o]l.), the tail of a fox.

{Fox evil}, a disease in which the hair falls off; alopecy.

{Fox grape} (Bot.), the name of two species of American grapes. The northern fox grape ({Vitis Labrusca}) is the origin of the varieties called {Isabella}, {Concord}, {Hartford}, etc., and the southern fox grape ({Vitis vulpina}) has produced the {Scuppernong}, and probably the {Catawba}.

{Fox hunter}. (a) One who pursues foxes with hounds. (b) A horse ridden in a fox chase.

{Fox shark} (Zo["o]l.), the thrasher shark. See {Thrasher shark}, under {Thrasher}.

{Fox sleep}, pretended sleep.

{Fox sparrow} (Zo["o]l.), a large American sparrow ({Passerella iliaca}); -- so called on account of its reddish color.

{Fox squirrel} (Zo["o]l.), a large North American squirrel ({Sciurus niger}, or {S. cinereus}). In the Southern States the black variety prevails; farther north the fulvous and gray variety, called the {cat squirrel}, is more common.

{Fox terrier} (Zo["o]l.), one of a peculiar breed of terriers, used in hunting to drive foxes from their holes, and for other purposes. There are rough- and smooth-haired varieties.

{Fox trot}, a pace like that which is adopted for a few steps, by a horse, when passing from a walk into a trot, or a trot into a walk.

{Fox wedge} (Mach. & Carpentry), a wedge for expanding the split end of a bolt, cotter, dowel, tenon, or other piece, to fasten the end in a hole or mortise and prevent withdrawal. The wedge abuts on the bottom of the hole and the piece is driven down upon it. Fastening by fox wedges is called foxtail wedging.

{Fox wolf} (Zo["o]l.), one of several South American wild dogs, belonging to the genus {Canis}. They have long, bushy tails like a fox. [1913 Webster]

Источник: Concord

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ConcordAnnual Report of the Receipts and ExpendituresКнига представляет собой репринтное издание. Несмотря на то, что была проведена серьезная работа по восстановлению первоначального качества издания, на некоторых страницах могут обнаружиться… — Книга по Требованию, - Подробнее...2011
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