Book: Vienna Congress of «Acte du Congres de vienne du 9 juin, 1815, avec ses annexes»

Acte du Congres de vienne du 9 juin, 1815, avec ses annexes

Серия: "-"

Книга представляет собой репринтное издание. Несмотря на то, что была проведена серьезная работа по восстановлению первоначального качества издания, на некоторых страницах могут обнаружиться небольшие "огрехи" :помарки, кляксы и т. п.

Издательство: "Книга по Требованию" (2011)

Купить за 689 руб в My-shop

Vienna, Congress of

(1814–15) Assembly that reorganized Europe after the Napoleonic Wars.

The powers of the Quadruple Alliance had concluded the Treaty of Chaumont just before Napoleon's first abdication and agreed to meet later in Vienna. There they were joined by Bourbon France as a major participant and by Sweden and Portugal; many minor states also sent representatives. The principal negotiators were Klemens, prince von Metternich, representing Francis II (Austria); Alexander I (Russia); Frederick William III and Karl August, prince von Hardenberg (Prussia); Viscount Castlereagh (Britain); and Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand (France). The Congress reduced France to its 1789 borders. A new kingdom of Poland, under Russian sovereignty, was established. To check possible future aggression by France, its neighbours were strengthened: the kingdom of The Netherlands acquired Belgium, Prussia gained territory along the Rhine River, and the Italian kingdom acquired Genoa. The German states were joined loosely in a new German Confederation, subject to Austria's influence. For its part in the defeat of Napoleon, Britain acquired valuable colonies, including Malta, the Cape of Good Hope, and Ceylon. The Vienna settlement was the most comprehensive treaty that Europe had ever seen, and the configuration of Europe established at the congress lasted for more than 40 years.

* * *

▪ European history
 assembly in 1814–15 that reorganized Europe after the Napoleonic Wars. Having begun in September 1814, five months after Napoleon (Napoleon I)'s first abdication, it completed its “Final Act” in June 1815, shortly before the Waterloo campaign and the final defeat of Napoleon. The settlement was the most comprehensive treaty that Europe had ever seen.

      Austria, Prussia, Russia, and Great Britain, the four powers chiefly instrumental in the overthrow of Napoleon, had concluded a special alliance among themselves with the Treaty of Chaumont, on March 9, 1814, a month before Napoleon's first abdication. The subsequent treaties of peace with France, signed on May 30 not only by the “four” but also by Sweden and Portugal and on July 20 by Spain, stipulated that all former belligerents should send plenipotentiaries to a congress in Vienna. Nevertheless, the “four” still intended to reserve the real making of decisions to themselves. Two months after the sessions began, however, Bourbon France was admitted to the “four.” The “four” thus became the “five,” and it was the committee of the “five” that was the real Congress of Vienna.

      Representatives began to arrive in Vienna toward the end of September 1814. Klemens, prince von Metternich (Metternich, Klemens, Fürst von), principal minister of Austria, represented his emperor, Francis II. Tsar Alexander I of Russia directed his own diplomacy. King Frederick William III of Prussia had Karl, prince von Hardenberg (Hardenberg, Karl August, Fürst von), as his principal minister. Great Britain was represented by its foreign minister, Viscount Castlereagh (Castlereagh, Robert Stewart, Viscount). When Castlereagh had to return to his parliamentary duties, the Duke of Wellington (Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, 1st duke of, marquess of Douro, marquess of Wellington, earl of Wellington, Viscount Wellington of Talavera and of Wellington, Baron Douro or Wellesley) replaced him, and Lord Clancarty was principal representative after the duke's departure. The restored Louis XVIII of France sent Talleyrand (Talleyrand, Charles-Maurice de, prince de Bénévent). Spain, Portugal, and Sweden had only men of moderate ability to represent them. Many of the rulers of the minor states of Europe put in an appearance. With them came a host of courtiers, secretaries, and ladies to enjoy the magnificent social life of the Austrian court.

      The major points of friction occurred over the disposition of Poland and Saxony, the conflicting claims of Sweden, Denmark, and Russia, and the adjustment of the borders of the German states. In general, Russia and Prussia were opposed by Austria, France, and England, which at one point (Jan. 3, 1815) went so far as to conclude a secret treaty of defensive alliance. The major final agreements were as follows.

      For Poland, Alexander gave back Galicia to Austria and gave Thorn and a region around it to Prussia; Kraków was made a free town. The rest of the duchy of Warsaw was incorporated as a separate kingdom under the Russian emperor's sovereignty. Prussia got two-fifths of Saxony and was compensated by extensive additions in Westphalia and on the left bank of the Rhine. It was Castlereagh who insisted on Prussian acceptance of this latter territory, with which it had been suggested the king of Saxony should be compensated; Castlereagh wanted Prussia to guard the Rhine against France and act as a buttress to the new Kingdom of The Netherlands, which comprised both the former United Provinces and Belgium. Austria was compensated by Lombardy and Venice and also got back most of Tirol. Bavaria, Württemberg, and Baden on the whole did well. Hanover was also enlarged. The outline of a constitution, a loose confederation, was drawn up for Germany—a triumph for Metternich. Denmark lost Norway to Sweden but got Lauenburg, while Swedish Pomerania went to Prussia. Switzerland was given a new constitution.

      In Italy, Piedmont absorbed Genoa; Tuscany and Modena went to an Austrian archduke; Parma was given to Marie-Louise, consort of the deposed Napoleon. The Papal States were restored to the pope, Naples to the Sicilian Bourbons.

      Valuable articles were agreed to on the free navigation of international rivers and diplomatic precedence. Castlereagh's great efforts for the abolition of the slave trade were rewarded only by a pious declaration.

      The Final Act of the Congress of Vienna comprised all these agreements in one great instrument. It was signed on June 9, 1815, by the “eight” (except Spain, who refused as a protest against the Italian settlement). All the other powers subsequently acceded to it.

      As a result, the lines laid down by the Congress of Vienna lasted, except for one or two changes, for more than 40 years.

* * *

Источник: Vienna, Congress of

Другие книги схожей тематики:

АвторКнигаОписаниеГодЦенаТип книги
Vienna Congress ofActe du Congres de vienne du 9 juin, 1815, avec ses annexesКнига представляет собой репринтное издание. Несмотря на то, что была проведена серьезная работа по восстановлению первоначального качества издания, на некоторых страницах могут обнаружиться… — @Книга по Требованию, @ @- @ @ Подробнее...2011
689бумажная книга

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Histoire de la Savoie de 1815 à 1860 — Histoire de la Savoie Antiquité La Savoie dans l Antiquité Sapaudie Moyen Âge …   Wikipédia en Français

  • François de Jaucourt — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Jaucourt. François de Jaucourt Arnail François de Jaucourt …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cantons de l'Est (Belgique) — Les cantons de l’Est sont rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de dommages de guerre en application du traité de Versailles (article 34). Ils furent souvent appelés jusqu aux années 1970 les cantons rédimés [1]. Ils se composent de l ancienne …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cantons De L'Est (Belgique) — Les cantons de l’Est, par certains appelés cantons rédimés[1], se composent de l ancienne circonscription (Kreis) prussienne d Eupen Malmedy et de Moresnet neutre (Kelmis), rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de dommages de guerre en… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cantons de l'est (belgique) — Les cantons de l’Est, par certains appelés cantons rédimés[1], se composent de l ancienne circonscription (Kreis) prussienne d Eupen Malmedy et de Moresnet neutre (Kelmis), rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de dommages de guerre en… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cantons de l’Est (Belgique) — Cantons de l Est (Belgique) Les cantons de l’Est, par certains appelés cantons rédimés[1], se composent de l ancienne circonscription (Kreis) prussienne d Eupen Malmedy et de Moresnet neutre (Kelmis), rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cantons rédimés — Cantons de l Est (Belgique) Les cantons de l’Est, par certains appelés cantons rédimés[1], se composent de l ancienne circonscription (Kreis) prussienne d Eupen Malmedy et de Moresnet neutre (Kelmis), rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Eupen et Malmédy — Cantons de l Est (Belgique) Les cantons de l’Est, par certains appelés cantons rédimés[1], se composent de l ancienne circonscription (Kreis) prussienne d Eupen Malmedy et de Moresnet neutre (Kelmis), rattachés à la Belgique en 1919 au titre de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord — Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord, par Pierre Paul Prud hon, 1809 (Château de Valençay)[1] …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Charles-Maurice De Talleyrand — Périgord Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord 1er président du Conseil des ministres français …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Charles-Maurice De Talleyrand-Perigord — Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord 1er président du Conseil des ministres français …   Wikipédia en Français