Book: Gaiman Neil «The View from the Cheap Seats. Selected Non-fiction»

The View from the Cheap Seats. Selected Non-fiction

Производитель: "Stoughton"

The View from the Cheap Seats draws together myriad non-fiction writing by international phenomenon and Sunday Times bestselling author Neil Gaiman. From Make Good Art, the speech that went viral, to pieces on artists and legends including Terry Pratchett and Lou Reed, the collection offers a glimpse into the head and heart of one of the most acclaimed writers of our time.`Literature does not occur in a vacuum. It cannot be a monologue. It has to be a conversation`Welcome to the conversation. Neil Gaiman fled the land of journalism to find truths through storytelling and sanctuary in not needing to get all the facts right. Of course, the real world continued to make up its own stories around him, and he has responded over the years with a wealth of ideas and introductions, dreams and speeches. Here`we can meet the writer full on`(Stephen Fry) as he opens our minds to the people he admires and the things he believes might just mean something - and makes room for us to join the conversation too. ISBN:978-1-472-20801-9

Издательство: "Stoughton" (2016)

ISBN: 978-1-472-20801-9

Купить за 1732 грн (только Украина) в

Gaiman, Neil

▪ 2005

      In the eight years since the conclusion of his groundbreaking Sandman series for DC Comics, Neil Gaiman had established himself as a successful novelist, an outspoken activist for authors' legal rights, and a creator of children's tales in the fantastic and macabre tradition of the Brothers Grimm. In 2004 he concluded his best-selling series 1602 for Marvel Comics. The story reinterpreted classic Marvel superheroes and marked Gaiman's first foray into the superhero genre since his run on the critically acclaimed but legally troubled Miracleman in the early 1990s. Fittingly, the proceeds from 1602, one of the year's best-selling comics, were used to free Miracleman from the copyright issues that had entangled it since 1998.

      Gaiman was born on Nov. 10, 1960, in Porchester, Eng. He grew up in Sussex and attended Whitgift School in Croydon. Upon graduating, he freelanced as a journalist before earning his first author credit for a paperback biography of the pop music group Duran Duran in 1984. While the subject matter was certainly not indicative of his later work, its success was, and the first printing sold out in a matter of days. It was around this time that he met artist Dave McKean, and the two collaborated on the graphic novel Violent Cases (1987). The work established them as rising stars in the comic world, and soon the two were noticed by publishers on both sides of the Atlantic. They submitted story and art treatments to DC Comics, and the result was Black Orchid (1988), a three-part miniseries that helped establish the atmosphere for the DC renaissance of the late 1980s. Along with Alan Moore's work on Watchmen (1987) and Swamp Thing (1983–87) and Frank Miller's gritty interpretation of Batman in The Dark Knight Returns (1986), the success of Black Orchid showed that a market existed for dark, mature stories written for an adult audience. This became even clearer with the launch of Sandman in 1989.

      Sandman was a completely new kind of comic. While McKean stayed on as cover artist for the entire run of the series, a rotating series of interior artists helped flavour each individual story arc. In addition, the stories were unlike any previously seen in mainstream comics. The protagonist was Morpheus, the manifestation of the ability of sentient beings to dream. Like many other pantheons, the Endless, Morpheus's siblings, were godlike beings with human foibles and drives. A typical story was so littered with literary allusions and historical references that Internet fan sites soon began offering detailed annotations of individual issues. By the time the series ended in 1996, Sandman had captured an enviable list of awards and was DC's top-selling title. Gaiman also topped best-seller lists with his novels Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett, 1990), Neverwhere (1996), Stardust (1999), and American Gods (2001) and with his children's book Coraline (2002). In 2003 he revisited the Sandman characters in Endless Nights, an anthology that had the distinction of being the first graphic novel to earn a place on the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover fiction.

Michael Ray

* * *

▪ British writer
in full  Neil Richard Gaiman 
born Nov. 10, 1960, Porchester, Hampshire, Eng.
 
 British writer who earned critical praise and popular success with richly imagined fantasy tales that frequently featured a darkly humorous tone.

      Gaiman grew up in Sussex and attended Whitgift School in Croydon. Upon graduating, he worked as a freelance journalist before earning his first author credit for a paperback biography of the pop music group Duran Duran in 1984. While the subject matter was certainly not indicative of his later work, its success was, and the first printing sold out in a matter of days. It was around this time that he met artist Dave McKean, and the two collaborated on the graphic novel Violent Cases (1987). The work established them as rising stars in the comic world, and soon the two were noticed by publishers on both sides of the Atlantic. They submitted story and art treatments to DC Comics, and the result was Black Orchid (1988), a three-part miniseries that helped establish the atmosphere for the DC renaissance of the late 1980s. Along with Alan Moore's work on Watchmen (1987) and Swamp Thing (1983–87) and Frank Miller's gritty interpretation of Batman in The Dark Knight Returns (1986), the success of Black Orchid showed that a market existed for dark, mature stories written for an adult audience. This became even clearer with the launch of Sandman in 1989.

      Sandman was a completely new kind of comic. While McKean stayed on as cover artist for the book's entire run, a rotating series of interior artists helped flavour each individual story arc. In addition, the stories were unlike any previously seen in mainstream comics. The protagonist was Morpheus, the manifestation of the ability of sentient beings to dream. Like many other pantheons, the Endless—Morpheus's siblings—were godlike beings with human foibles and drives. A typical story was so littered with literary allusions and historical references that Internet fan sites soon began offering detailed annotations of individual issues. By the time the series ended in 1996, Sandman had captured an enviable list of awards and was DC Comics' top-selling title. Gaiman also topped best-seller lists with his novels Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett, 1990), Neverwhere (1996), Stardust (1999; filmed 2007), and American Gods (2001) and with his children's book Coraline (2002; filmed 2009). He revisited the Sandman characters in 2003 with Endless Nights, an anthology that had the distinction of being the first graphic novel to earn a place on The New York Times best-seller list for hardcover fiction.

 In 2004 Gaiman penned 1602 for Marvel Comics. The story reinterpreted classic Marvel superheroes and marked Gaiman's first foray into the superhero genre since his run on the critically acclaimed but legally troubled Marvelman (known in the United States as Miracleman) in the early 1990s. Fittingly, the proceeds from 1602, one of that year's best-selling comics, were used to finance Gaiman's effort to free Marvelman from the copyright issues that had entangled it since 1998. The following year he reunited with McKean for the visually stunning film MirrorMask, and they collaborated on The Wolves in the Walls, an illustrated horror story for children. Anansi Boys (2006) revisited some of the characters introduced in American Gods, and it debuted at the top of The New York Times best-seller list. In 2009 Gaiman received the Newbery Medal for his distinguished contribution to literature for children for The Graveyard Book (2008), the macabre yet sweet tale of an orphan raised by a cemetery full of ghosts.

Michael Ray
 

* * *

Источник: Gaiman, Neil

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