Book: Yvonne Clarke «How Idioms Work»

How Idioms Work

Производитель: "Garnet"

How Idioms Work is designed for adult learners of English who, despite a good grasp of English, find idiomatic language in their workplace or university confusing or incomprehensible. This fully photocopiable Resource Book provides clear, literal representations of high-frequency idioms chosen specifically for their lexical value in the world today. Ten eight-page sections comprise activity cards, definitions, reading consolidation (using semi-authentic newspaper articles) and revision activities. It also includes teacher tips and recommendations, 20 suggested activity types, an answer key and templates for devising furhter activity cards. How Idioms Work is ideal for complementing any skills-based lessons, as well as a general filler to add fun and variety to teaching. Each section of photocopiable pages is organized as follows:- a summary of the idioms being covered;- illustrations of the idioms;- written idioms;- definitions of the idioms;- newspaper articles with idioms in use;r- evision exercises and a talking point.

Издательство: "Garnet" (2009)

ISBN: 978-1-85964-554-3

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How Idioms WorkHow Idioms Work is designed for adult learners of English who, despite a good grasp of English, find idiomatic language in their workplace or university confusing or incomprehensible. This fully… — Garnet, - Подробнее...20091675бумажная книга

Look at other dictionaries:

  • work — (from Idioms in Speech) to be successful or effective; to have the desired result (of a plan or a method, something used or attempted) This idea might just work. (I. Murdoch) It s a pretty theory, Shannon. In practice it won t work. (A. Cronin)… …   Idioms and examples

  • work — n. & v. n. 1 the application of mental or physical effort to a purpose; the use of energy. 2 a a task to be undertaken. b the materials for this. c (prec. by the; foll. by of) a task occupying (no more than) a specified time (the work of a… …   Useful english dictionary

  • in the know — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Knowing about things that most people do not know about; knowing secrets or understanding a special subject. * /Tina helped Professor Smith make some of the exam questions, and she felt important to be in the know./ * /In… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • in the know — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Knowing about things that most people do not know about; knowing secrets or understanding a special subject. * /Tina helped Professor Smith make some of the exam questions, and she felt important to be in the know./ * /In… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • blank check — {n.} 1. A bank check written to a person who can then write in how much money he wants. * /John s father sent him a blank check to pay his school bills./ 2. {informal} Permission to another person to do anything he decides to do. * /The teacher… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • blank check — {n.} 1. A bank check written to a person who can then write in how much money he wants. * /John s father sent him a blank check to pay his school bills./ 2. {informal} Permission to another person to do anything he decides to do. * /The teacher… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • have it — {v. phr.} 1. To hear or get news; understand. * /I have it on the best authority that we will be paid for our work next week./ 2. To do something in a certain way. * /Make up your mind, because you can t have it both ways. You must either stay… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • roll up one's sleeves — To get ready for a hard job; prepare to work hard or seriously. * /When Paul took his science examination, he saw how little he knew about science. He rolled up his sleeves and went to work./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • have it — {v. phr.} 1. To hear or get news; understand. * /I have it on the best authority that we will be paid for our work next week./ 2. To do something in a certain way. * /Make up your mind, because you can t have it both ways. You must either stay… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • roll up one's sleeves — To get ready for a hard job; prepare to work hard or seriously. * /When Paul took his science examination, he saw how little he knew about science. He rolled up his sleeves and went to work./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all right(2) — {adj. phr.} 1. Good enough; correct; suitable. * /His work is always all right./ 2. In good health or spirits; well. * / How are you? I m all right. / 3. {slang} Good. * /He s an all right guy./ …   Dictionary of American idioms